COVID 19 and Delivery Update

We are a proudly Australian owned and operated business and are committed to continuing to support you in this difficult time.

With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.

In regards to deliveries, as at the 1st of September 2021, “COVID-19 cases in Victoria and NSW are causing additional delays with freight partner collection." Detailed information can be found at: https://auspost.com.au/service-updates/domestic-delivery-times. We thank you for your order, and will do our very best to get it to you as soon as possible.

For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our client services team on clientservices@sleepcorp.com.au

Blog

Don't Let the Bed Bugs Bite

Protect-A-Bed Blog Travelling Bed Bugs

Every year billions of people are travelling and each trip they take the risk of bringing home a bed bug infestation.   

Bed bugs love to hitchhike on luggage. 

Found worldwide and an increasing problem in Australia and New Zealand, be sure to know what to look for these holidays or whenever travelling to ensure you and your family are protected from their nasty bites.

First know what to look for:

Protect-A-Bed Blog Bed BugsSmall in size, they are attracted to warmth, and are most active at night biting areas of exposed skin while sleeping.  Their bite causing an allergic reaction which is displayed on the skin as itchy red welts usually not felt until some minutes or hours after the bite.

Bed bugs have small, flat oval bodies.  Adults are brown in colour, reddening after feeding. Despite common misconceptions that they are too small to see, fully grown they are about 4-5mm in length, small but visible to the naked eye.

Hiding in nooks and crannies they are primarily nocturnal, emerging in the middle of the night to feed on those sleeping.  It is therefore, often not the bed bugs, but tell-tale signs of their infestation that may be seen first. Little brown or black dots found on linens or the mattress itself.

  • Brownish-red splotches from a bed bug that had fed on blood and was shortly thereafter crushed
  • Shredded bed bug skins
  • Deposited white eggs and dark fecal matter. Eggs will be approximately 1mm in length, and difficult, but not impossible to see.
Although found in carpets, the cracks in wooden floors and walls and the seams of furniture they are most common in mattresses.

    What to do when booking a hotel room:

     When booking a hotel room, you can:

    • First check to see if they have had any reviews indicating a past history of struggling with a bed bug infestation.  
    • See if there is a Bed Bug Registry for the country you are travelling to that documents cases of bed bugs in hotels and apartments.
    • You may also wish to call the hotel to see what Bed Bug protective measures they have in place, such as the use of Protect-A-Bed® Buglock® Mattress Encasement's.

     What to do when you get to your hotel:

    1. Before checking for bed bugs keep your luggage in the bathroom; it’s the least likely place for bed bugs due to the tile floors, lack of places to hide, and distance from where people sleep. 
    2. Then, inspect for the bugs or the small spots they leave behind. Look under the sheets and bedding, around and under the mattress, and behind the headboard.
    3. Keep searching; bed bugs are typically found about 4 metres from the bed so you should also check other areas they could be hiding (behind picture frames, under things on the nightstand, etc).
    4. Lastly, check in the cushions and seams of the furniture in the room, and any other area that you missed.

    If you have discovered bed bugs or evidence that would lead you to suspect their presence, alert the hotel staff immediately, do not stay in that room, and strongly consider finding a new hotel all together.

    Bed bugs in transit:

    There have been reported cases of Bed Bugs in transit.  After all they love to hitchhike on luggage and clothing. Having a hard shell suitcase can assist in eliminating the areas in which a bed bug can hide and it can easily be cleaned with an alcohol wipe after your flight.  If you do see any signs of bed bugs while travelling let the flight attendant on your plane or tour guide know as soon as possible.

    When you get home:

    When you get home wash all clothes you took on the trip in hot water including the ones that might be clean or you have worn on the way home.  Vacuum and check your luggage for any signs of bed bugs and then store them safely away from your bed.

    Use Protect-A-Bed® Allerzip Mattress Encasement's on your beds for Fit ‘n’ Forget protection.

    Not only providing peace of mind against bed bugs and dust mite allergens they help protect your mattress investment from everyday spills and stains.

    The Protect-A-Bed® BugLock® system has a dust-proof flap and tamper-proof SecureSeal® making the mattress or pillow bed bug entry and escape proof, whilst also ensuring allergens can’t become airborne. Simply Fit'n'Forget® by laying a Protect-A-Bed®  fitted mattress protector on the top for easy removal and regular washing with other bedding.

    Sleep Well, Live Well

    Combating Jet Lag

    Protect-A-Bed Blog - Tips for Combating Jet Lag

    What causes Jet Lag?

    Jet lag occurs when you fly across one or more time zones.

    Daylight plays an important role in our body’s natural biological clock or circadian rhythm, affecting the release of Melatonin which tells us when we should go to sleep and wake up.  Jet lag occurs because our body's circadian rhythm has not had time to synchronise to the change in time zones.

    The result, our body is telling us to stay awake when it’s late at night, or telling us it’s time to sleep when it is the only the middle of the afternoon.

    Jet lag, affects different people differently, and can happen to anyone regardless of their age or level of fitness.

    As recognised by betterhealth.vic.gov.au it is also often worse if you are travelling in an easterly direction

    Your circadian rhythm (body clock) is less confused if you travel westward. This is because travelling west ‘prolongs’ the body clock’s experience of its normal day-night cycle (the normal tendency of the body clock in most of us is slightly longer than 24 hours). Travelling eastwards, however, runs in direct opposition to the body clock. If you suffer badly from jet lag, it may be worthwhile considering a westerly travel route if possible.

    Symptoms of Jet Lag

    The symptoms of Jet Lag vary between people.  They may include:

    • Insomnia
    • Fatigue
    • Headaches
    • Irritability
    • Loss of Appetite
    • Lack of concentration

    Coping with Jet Lag

    Jet lag generally lasts for 2-3 days and although there is no cure there are things that you can do before, during and after travel to help.

    Before Leaving 

    • Ensure you have had enough sleep leading up to your travel and are not already suffering from a lack of sleep.
    • If possible, begin moving your sleep patterns towards the sleep and wake time at your destination. Go to bed and get up a little earlier or later, gradually adjusting the length of time before your trip.

    During the Flight 

    • Change the time on your watch to the time at your destination as soon as possible. The sooner you make the change, the easier it will be.
    • Open the blinds on your flight to allow in sunlight only during the daylight hours at your destination.
    • Try to sleep on the plane during the night time hours at your destination. A sleep mask, headphones or ear plugs may help block out any light and noise.
    • Attempt to eat and sleep on the plane at the same time you will be eating and sleeping at your destination.
    • Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Avoid alcohol and drinks that contain caffeine that may disturb your sleep cycles.  (see our blog on Coffee and Sleep) 

     After the Flight

    • Adjust your sleeping and eating patterns to the new time zone as soon as possible. Try to stay awake to your usual bedtime and get up when you normally would rather than having a sleep in.
    • The Sleep Health Foundation does recommend that you can take short naps when adapting, which may help you feel more alert if necessary but also state that
    “It is important that you sleep for no longer than 30 minutes and that you are awake for at least 4 hours before you go to bed.” 
    • If possible, during the day get outside or expose yourself to as much natural light as possible. Remember that daylight works with our Circadian Rhythm which tells us when it’s time to be awake and sleep.
    • When ready to go to sleep, make sure the room you are staying in is set at the optimal temperature for sleep which is around 18-20 degrees and use ear plugs or headphones to drown out any unfamiliar sounds that may stop you falling asleep or wake you in the night.

    Most importantly be prepared to give yourself the time to adjust. It will often take at least 2-3 days.

     

    The importance of maintaining your children's bed time during school holidays

    School holiday’s are here again and along with keeping your little one’s occupied with activities and play dates it can be tempting to let them stay up that little bit later. 

    And as tempting as it is, remember that whether you are staying at home or going away it is important that you try to maintain a regular sleep pattern for your children.  Without it they will become tired and grumpy, making your days more difficult and when the holiday’s are over you will have to battle to get them back into their bedtime routine.

    As recommended by the Sleep Health Organisation “Bed time should not vary by more than an hour between school and non-school nights” and “the same goes for the time your child wakes up”

    To help with this in the holiday’s ensure that you give your children time to relax before bed.  Put away toys and turn of screens.  Anything stimulating.  Try reading a favourite book or listening to some calming music.

    If you are travelling and away from home, a different environment can make it difficult for them to settle.  Take with you a toy, pillow or blanket that your child associates with sleep.  It will make them more comfortable and assist in them getting to sleep.

    When travelling also ensure that where you are staying has Protect-A-Bed® Mattress and Pillow Protectors.  An unprotected mattress or pillow is home to millions of dust mites, mould and bacteria which may cause allergens, asthma and eczema. 

    30% of us are allergic to dust mites so chances are if you or your family are sleeping on an unprotected mattress while away asthma and allergies are more likely to occur.  None of us want to get sick, or have sick children, when away on holidays!

    And for those of you who have children still bedwetting, consider taking an extra mattress protector or linen protector of your own with you.  Pop it on the bed and if an accident occurs you can easily remove it in the night, getting back to sleep quickly with the knowledge that the mattress your child is sleeping won’t become wet or stained.

    With the holiday’s coming to a close, if you have not been able to maintain the consistent bedtime at the start of the holidays, get back to a normal routine before school starts.   If bedtime has become later than usual, slowly push it back by about 15 minutes or so a night until it is where it should be.

    A fun holiday activity that encourages children to keep to their bedtime is making a Sleep Clock.   Head to the Sleep Health Foundations website and download a easy to use template created by Professor Kurt Lushington from the University of South Australia.

    Everyone deserves the simple pleasure of a good night’s sleep.