COVID-19 and Delivery Update

We are a proudly Australian owned and operated business and are committed to continuing to support you in this difficult time.

With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.


Deliveries

Delivery networks across Australia are currently experiencing delays.

Detailed information on delays currently being experienced by our Freight Partner, Australia Post, can be found at: https://auspost.com.au/service-updates/domestic-delivery-times

We thank you for your order, and will do our very best to get it to you as soon as possible. For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our client services team at clientservices@sleepcorp.com.au or on 1300 857 123.

Blog

Three Key Elements to a Good Night's Sleep

You probably ask yourself all the time what makes a good night’s sleep? If you google it, you’ll most likely see lists upon lists of top ten tips or the 5 best secrets to a good night’s sleep. Whilst these lists probably have great ideas, they may be redundant without understanding the key elements that make a good night’s sleep.

We’ve narrowed it down to three key elements for a good night’s sleep:

  1. Duration
  2. Continuity
  3. Depth

Now you know the three elements let’s expand on what they are so you have a basic understanding and can apply those great tips you see everywhere including our Instagram 😉.

1. Duration

Duration refers to the length of time that you sleep for, your sleep needs to be long enough that when you wake up the next day you are feeling refreshed and alert. Generally speaking, for an adult this is between 7-9 hours of sleep, with the length being longer for teenagers and young children.

 

Life Stage

Required Sleep

Older Adults

7-8 hours

Young Adults

7-9 hours

Teenagers

8-10 hours

School-aged children

9-11 hours

Preschoolers

10-13 hours

Toddlers

11-14 hours

Infants

12-15 hours

Newborns

14-17 hours

 

2. Continuity

Your sleep needs to be long and uninterrupted, even if you are still getting your required hours of sleep a night if you are waking up multiple times this can affect the overall quality of your sleep. There are four stages of sleep that humans go through each night:

  1. Stage 1 – A light sleep that only lasts a few minutes and is a transition period between wakefulness and sleep. Our body and brain start slowing down.
  2. Stage 2 – Occurs when the body starts transitioning from a light sleep to a deeper sleep. Our bodily functions continue to slow down, muscles relax, eye movement stops and our body temperature reduces. On top of this brain waves slow down further.
  3. Deep Sleep – Our heart rate and breathing rate are at their lowest during this part of the sleep cycle. The muscles and eyes are also very relaxed, and the brain waves become even slower.
  4. REM (Rapid Eye Movement) Sleep – Occurs roughly 90 minutes after falling asleep, this is closer to a state of wakefulness with our breathing and heart rate increasing as well as our eyes start to move rapidly side to side behind our eyelids, this is when most of our dreams occur.

As you can see our body slides through different and important stages of sleep each night and can do this multiple times, so if you are repeatedly waking up during the night you are disrupting your bodies sleep cycle.

3. Depth

This ties in with the stages of sleep we touched on above when talking about sleep continuity, you want your sleep to be deep and restorative. This means we especially want to make sure we are reaching the third and fourth stage of sleep known as slow wave sleep.  Slow wave sleep is attributed to play a pivotal role in brain restoration and recovery as well as memory consolidation, whilst also producing human growth hormone which repairs tissues and cells in our bodies. All very important for us to be functional humans the next day.

Now you are equipped with the understanding of the key factors making up a good night’s sleep, you can now start creating a sleep routine that will aid you in sleeping the required amount and protecting it from interruption.

Combating Jet Lag

Protect-A-Bed Blog - Tips for Combating Jet Lag

What causes Jet Lag?

Jet lag occurs when you fly across one or more time zones.

Daylight plays an important role in our body’s natural biological clock or circadian rhythm, affecting the release of Melatonin which tells us when we should go to sleep and wake up.  Jet lag occurs because our body's circadian rhythm has not had time to synchronise to the change in time zones.

The result, our body is telling us to stay awake when it’s late at night, or telling us it’s time to sleep when it is the only the middle of the afternoon.

Jet lag, affects different people differently, and can happen to anyone regardless of their age or level of fitness.

As recognised by betterhealth.vic.gov.au it is also often worse if you are travelling in an easterly direction

Your circadian rhythm (body clock) is less confused if you travel westward. This is because travelling west ‘prolongs’ the body clock’s experience of its normal day-night cycle (the normal tendency of the body clock in most of us is slightly longer than 24 hours). Travelling eastwards, however, runs in direct opposition to the body clock. If you suffer badly from jet lag, it may be worthwhile considering a westerly travel route if possible.

Symptoms of Jet Lag

The symptoms of Jet Lag vary between people.  They may include:

  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Irritability
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Lack of concentration

Coping with Jet Lag

Jet lag generally lasts for 2-3 days and although there is no cure there are things that you can do before, during and after travel to help.

Before Leaving 

  • Ensure you have had enough sleep leading up to your travel and are not already suffering from a lack of sleep.
  • If possible, begin moving your sleep patterns towards the sleep and wake time at your destination. Go to bed and get up a little earlier or later, gradually adjusting the length of time before your trip.

During the Flight 

  • Change the time on your watch to the time at your destination as soon as possible. The sooner you make the change, the easier it will be.
  • Open the blinds on your flight to allow in sunlight only during the daylight hours at your destination.
  • Try to sleep on the plane during the night time hours at your destination. A sleep mask, headphones or ear plugs may help block out any light and noise.
  • Attempt to eat and sleep on the plane at the same time you will be eating and sleeping at your destination.
  • Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Avoid alcohol and drinks that contain caffeine that may disturb your sleep cycles.  (see our blog on Coffee and Sleep) 

 After the Flight

  • Adjust your sleeping and eating patterns to the new time zone as soon as possible. Try to stay awake to your usual bedtime and get up when you normally would rather than having a sleep in.
  • The Sleep Health Foundation does recommend that you can take short naps when adapting, which may help you feel more alert if necessary but also state that
“It is important that you sleep for no longer than 30 minutes and that you are awake for at least 4 hours before you go to bed.” 
  • If possible, during the day get outside or expose yourself to as much natural light as possible. Remember that daylight works with our Circadian Rhythm which tells us when it’s time to be awake and sleep.
  • When ready to go to sleep, make sure the room you are staying in is set at the optimal temperature for sleep which is around 18-20 degrees and use ear plugs or headphones to drown out any unfamiliar sounds that may stop you falling asleep or wake you in the night.

Most importantly be prepared to give yourself the time to adjust. It will often take at least 2-3 days.