COVID 19 and Delivery Update

We are a proudly Australian owned and operated business and are committed to continuing to support you in this difficult time.

With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.

In regards to deliveries, as at the 1st of September 2021, “COVID-19 cases in Victoria and NSW are causing additional delays with freight partner collection." Detailed information can be found at: https://auspost.com.au/service-updates/domestic-delivery-times. We thank you for your order, and will do our very best to get it to you as soon as possible.

For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our client services team on clientservices@sleepcorp.com.au

Blog

Is getting a better night’s sleep one of your New Year’s resolutions?

Protect-A-Bed Blog Make getting a good night's sleep your new years resolution

Sleep is vital to our everyday well being.  Getting the right amount of regular sleep will make you feel more energised and motivated, helping you to achieve other goals that you might have for this year, such as doing more exercise,

Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time.  It will help create a natural rhythm, and sleep-wake cycle for your body. 

Also ensure you are getting the recommended amount of sleep for someone your age.   For an adult this is 7-9 hours a night.  For a guide on the recommended sleep time for different ages check out https://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/how-much-sleep-do-you-really-need.html

Look at what can influence the quality of your sleep, and work on making changes where needed.

  • Have your evening meal at least two hours before bedtime. Having a full stomach can make it difficult to sleep.
  • Avoid caffeine late in the day. Caffeine is a stimulant and although it may give us a much needed wake-up or boost during the day, it can also affect our sleep and contribute to us feeling more tired the following day.  Although there are conflicting views most agree that coffee that should be avoided at least 3-7 hours before bedtime.  Learn more in our Blog “Is how much coffee you drink affecting your sleep” from September 19 which can be found below.
  • Likewise try to avoid alcohol at least four hours before bed. Although alcohol may help you get too sleep, it will disrupt your sleep during the night and is associated with more frequent waking up.

“Another reason people get lower-quality sleep following alcohol is that it blocks REM sleep, which is often considered the most restorative type of sleep. With less REM sleep, you’re likely to wake up feeling groggy and unfocused.”  - sleepfoundation.org 

  • Have a set time before bed that you use to wind down and relax. Don’t overstimulate your body or brain. Avoid strenuous exercise, watching a scary or dramatic TV show, stop checking your work emails or social media….. Try a relaxing bath, mediation, reading or listening to soothing music.
  • Dim your devices screens in the evening and try putting a curfew on your devices of 1-2 hours before bedtime. The longer the better, and avoid checking email or social media in bed.  The blue light emitted from devices such as smartphones, tablets, computers and the TV, can at night all reduce the production of the sleep hormone melatonin.  This may result in difficulty sleeping and increased drowsiness during the day.

Ensure your bedroom offers the best possible sleep environment

  • Keep the bedroom dark at night and ensure the room temperature is not too hot or too cold.

“A cool 16-18°C (60-65°F) is thought to be an ideal temperature in a bedroom. Temperatures over 24°C (71°F) are likely to cause restlessness, while a cold room of about 12°C (53°F) will make it difficult to drop off.”  - Sleep Council UK 

  • Ensure your sleep environment is healthy. Dust mites found in bedding are a common cause of asthma, allergies and asthma.  Protect-A-Bed mattress, pillow and quilt protectors will provide an allergy barrier against any dust mites living in your mattress or quilts.
  • Keep the bedroom for sleep and free of distractions. Where possible no televisions, computers, radio’s and phones.

It may take a little adjustment for you to get into a new routine, but just remember that if you are getting the right amount of sleep regularly you should feel better and have more energy for the things you want to achieve.

Sleep well, live well

 

Hot in Bed

Protect-A-Bed Blog Hot in Bed

 Are you or your partner finding yourself uncomfortably hot at night? Sweating, tossing and turning, resulting in a broken night’s sleep and leaving you feeling lethargic the next day?

Your core body temperature works with your circadian rhythm, to help determine when you are ready to go to sleep and when you are ready to wake up.  Your body temperature drops when you begin to feel sleepy and is at its lowest at around 4am, before increasing.

So if you are having difficulty falling asleep or waking up at time you need to consider what maybe affecting your temperature leading up to your bedtime and during the night.

 As identified in Time’s article You Asked: Why Do I Sweat When I Sleep by (Markham Heid March 21, 2018)

“Intense exercise too close to bed can also “throw off” the body’s thermoregulation processes, says Michael Grandner, an associate professor and director of the Sleep & Health Research Program at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He explains that a person’s body temperature naturally dips just before bed, which promotes sleep. Eating or exercising too close to bed can fire up your metabolism, which increases heat production and so may interfere with the body’s natural powering down.” 

In order to fall asleep quickly and too help get a good night’s sleep you firstly need to ensure your room is at the ideal temperature.   

“A cool 16-18°C (60-65°F) is thought to be an ideal temperature in a bedroom. Temperatures over 24°C (71°F) are likely to cause restlessness, while a cold room of about 12°C (53°F) will make it difficult to drop off.”  - sleepcouncil.org.uk/perfect-sleep environment 

But remember it is not just the air conditioner or heater that affects the temperature you are feeling when you are sleeping.  Your Pyjama’s and bedding can also play a part.  You might get into bed feeling cool and comfortable but if you may become hotter during the night due to the materials your Pyjama’s and bedding are made off.

Consider Natural Fibres such as TENCEL™.  TENCEL™ is a botanic fibre, derived from sustainable wood sources which are super soft.  The Smooth Fiber structure of TENCEL™ absorbs moisture more efficiently than cotton and is breathable helping support the body’s natural thermal regulating mechanism, keeping your skin feeling pleasantly cool and dry.

You may wish to check out our range of Protect-A-Bed TENCEL™ Mattress and Pillow Protectors®

If you have made these changes to help ensure the correct sleeping temperature and you are still waking hot or sweaty consider talking to your doctor. Sometimes the side effects of medication, menopause, hormonal imbalances, anxiety and sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and night terrors may also cause you to sweat when sleep.

 

 

Combating Jet Lag

Protect-A-Bed Blog - Tips for Combating Jet Lag

What causes Jet Lag?

Jet lag occurs when you fly across one or more time zones.

Daylight plays an important role in our body’s natural biological clock or circadian rhythm, affecting the release of Melatonin which tells us when we should go to sleep and wake up.  Jet lag occurs because our body's circadian rhythm has not had time to synchronise to the change in time zones.

The result, our body is telling us to stay awake when it’s late at night, or telling us it’s time to sleep when it is the only the middle of the afternoon.

Jet lag, affects different people differently, and can happen to anyone regardless of their age or level of fitness.

As recognised by betterhealth.vic.gov.au it is also often worse if you are travelling in an easterly direction

Your circadian rhythm (body clock) is less confused if you travel westward. This is because travelling west ‘prolongs’ the body clock’s experience of its normal day-night cycle (the normal tendency of the body clock in most of us is slightly longer than 24 hours). Travelling eastwards, however, runs in direct opposition to the body clock. If you suffer badly from jet lag, it may be worthwhile considering a westerly travel route if possible.

Symptoms of Jet Lag

The symptoms of Jet Lag vary between people.  They may include:

  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Irritability
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Lack of concentration

Coping with Jet Lag

Jet lag generally lasts for 2-3 days and although there is no cure there are things that you can do before, during and after travel to help.

Before Leaving 

  • Ensure you have had enough sleep leading up to your travel and are not already suffering from a lack of sleep.
  • If possible, begin moving your sleep patterns towards the sleep and wake time at your destination. Go to bed and get up a little earlier or later, gradually adjusting the length of time before your trip.

During the Flight 

  • Change the time on your watch to the time at your destination as soon as possible. The sooner you make the change, the easier it will be.
  • Open the blinds on your flight to allow in sunlight only during the daylight hours at your destination.
  • Try to sleep on the plane during the night time hours at your destination. A sleep mask, headphones or ear plugs may help block out any light and noise.
  • Attempt to eat and sleep on the plane at the same time you will be eating and sleeping at your destination.
  • Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Avoid alcohol and drinks that contain caffeine that may disturb your sleep cycles.  (see our blog on Coffee and Sleep) 

 After the Flight

  • Adjust your sleeping and eating patterns to the new time zone as soon as possible. Try to stay awake to your usual bedtime and get up when you normally would rather than having a sleep in.
  • The Sleep Health Foundation does recommend that you can take short naps when adapting, which may help you feel more alert if necessary but also state that
“It is important that you sleep for no longer than 30 minutes and that you are awake for at least 4 hours before you go to bed.” 
  • If possible, during the day get outside or expose yourself to as much natural light as possible. Remember that daylight works with our Circadian Rhythm which tells us when it’s time to be awake and sleep.
  • When ready to go to sleep, make sure the room you are staying in is set at the optimal temperature for sleep which is around 18-20 degrees and use ear plugs or headphones to drown out any unfamiliar sounds that may stop you falling asleep or wake you in the night.

Most importantly be prepared to give yourself the time to adjust. It will often take at least 2-3 days.

 

Spring clean your bedroom and help control allergens

Protect-A-Bed Spring Cleaning Blog

Spring has sprung, footy season is nearing an end, the tulips are blooming and the weather is getting warmer, but it is also allergy season. For many of us this means a stuffy or runny nose, itchy eyes or skin and lots of sneezing.

Common causes of allergies include:

Pollen

Affecting a lot of people pollen allergies or hayfever are caused by an allergy to the pollen produced by flowers, trees, grasses and weeds.  Pollen gets into the home when you open the doors and windows or travels inside on your clothing or with pets.  It is often further dispersed through the home by cooling and heating systems.

Dust Mites

Dust mites are one of the most common causes of allergies in the home.  Millions of these tiny creatures live in our mattresses, bed linen, carpets and furnishings.  Feeding of our skin cells, and producing waste, studies show that are a known cause or trigger of asthma and eczema. 

Mould

Mould is often found in damp, poorly ventilated areas such as kitchens, bathrooms and laundries. Mould and bacteria are also often found in mattresses and pillows with our perspiration, shredded skin cells and everyday spills and stains helping provide the perfect conditions for it to grow.

Pets

Fairly common, pet allergies are triggered by pet dander from animals such as such as cats and dogs.  Pets also often carry inside other allergens such as pollen and dust.

While there is not a lot you can do to control your outdoor environment, there are things you can do when spring cleaning, to help control your indoor environment, and in particular the bedroom, where seasonal allergies can be triggered all year round.

Spring cleaning the Bedroom – Tips

Get Prepared

  • Make sure you have all your cleaning supplies at hand.
  • Have three boxes on hand - one for rubbish, one for things that don’t belong in the bedroom and one for anything, such as old clothes, that you might like to donate to charity.

Clear the bedroom of clutter

  • Remember that the bedroom should be a peaceful area, a sanctuary. Remove any items that are not used or are unnecessary. Are they rubbish, do they belong in another room or can they go to charity?
  • Consider removing TVs or Computers. The blue light emitted from screens can reduce the production of the sleep hormone melatonin which may result in difficulty sleeping and increased drowsiness during the day.

Clean out the wardrobe and dresser drawers

  • Start by taking everything out.
  • If possible, store away any winter clothing and shoes.
  • We all have things in our wardrobe and drawers that we no longer wear.  When deciding what to put back ask yourself the following questions. Have I worn it in the last 12 months? Will I wear it again? Does it still fit? Do I like the way it looks? Is it damaged?
  • The things you don't need, if not damaged, consider selling online or donating to charity.

 Dust

  • Dust all surfaces in the bedroom with a damp or electrostatic cloth.
  • Remove all items from dressers and shelves, returning them as you go.
  • Move from one side of the room to the other so no areas are missed.

 Wipe down the walls

  • Clean off any marks. 
  • If you have young artists in the household and are using a cleaning block or another cleaning chemical always test in an inconspicuous area to ensure it does not fade or damage the paint or wallpaper. 

Clean windows and window furnishings

  • Clean your windows, inside and out. You might want to try using a water/vinegar mixture with a microfibre cloth. Don’t forget the window frames and tracks. If needed a toothbrush is great for getting into the corners.
  • Take down and wash curtains.
  • Dust and wipe down blinds with warm water.

Clean Flooring

  • Thoroughly vacuum the carpet or floor boards using a good quality vacuum cleaner with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter.
  • If you can, move furniture to get underneath.
  • Mop floor boards. Consider a professional clean for the carpet.
  • Wipe down baseboards.

Vacuum soft furnishing

  • Any chairs, couches or soft furnishings should also be vacuumed with a good quality vacuum cleaner with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter.

Replace Filters  

  • If your heating and cooling system is due for new filters, spring is a great reminder to replace them and preferably with HEPA versions if possible.

Strip and clean your bedding

  • Remove and clean all bedding, including sheets, blankets, mattress and pillow protectors. Washing in hot water (above 55°C will kill any dust mites).
  • Cover your mattress and pillows with Protect-A-Bed® mattress and pillow protectors. Protect-A-Bed®’s Miracle Layer™ acts as a barrier against any dust mite, mould and bacteria allergens that may be present in your mattress or pillows.  They also protect your mattress from yellowing that is caused by your perspiration and everyday spills. Recognised by the National Asthma Council of Australia and the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation of New Zealand’s Sensitive Choice Program you will see the Sensitive Choice Blue Butterfly on Protect-A-Bed® packaging.

If you or someone in your family suffer from severe allergies, asthma or eczema consider using Protect-A-Bed®’s Fully Encased Mattress Protectors. 

The fully encased Protect-A-Bed® Allerzip® Mattress and Pillow Encasement's feature a unique BugLock® system. which has a dust mite proof flap and Secure Seal® providing total protection.  Preventing dust mite, mould and bacteria allergens entering or escaping through the zipper.

Simply Fit n’ Forget by layering a Protect-A-Bed® Fitted Mattress Protector over the top for regular washing and drying with other linens.

  • And as you are most likely putting the flannel sheets away for the year, why not try some sheets and mattress protectors designed to keep you cool and comfortable? Those made from TENCEL™, for example, are hypoallergenic, smooth on the skin, and help manage heat and moisture for better sleep in warmer weather.
  • Don’t forget to wash or have your pillows dry-cleaned.
  • Fold and put into storage any winter bedding no longer needed.
  • Wipe down the bed frame.
  • Flip and rotate your mattress

Finally consider keeping flowers (with pollen) and pets out of the bedroom. 

Sit back, relax and enjoy the warmer days and remember if your allergies are triggered by pollen stay indoors on dry windy days and especially after storms as these are peak periods for airborne allergens.   

 

Do your pets share your bed?

Pets are part of our family and many of them sleep with us in our beds.  Snuggling up to us, providing affection, comfort and security, but is it healthy?

Although an adult cat sleeps for about for 12-16 a day and an adult dog 12-14 hours they can be up and down in the night.  Scratching, washing, having a midnight snack, or wanting to go outside.  All things that may disrupt your sleep leaving you feeling tired the next day.

And while the risks are low, cats and dogs carry bacteria that can be passed to us when in close contact.  They also shed dirt, pollen from running around outside, and pet dander a common cause or trigger of asthma and allergies.

So for a healthier night’s sleep, whilst enjoying the company of your pets here are some tips you may wish to follow:

  • Avoid waking up with them enjoying more of your pillow than you. Train them to sleep at the end of the bed. Perhaps on a blanket of their own.
  • Keep them and any dirt or bacteria they may be carrying above the covers and not under the doona with you.
  • Make a potty run with your pets before bed. This will lessen the likelihood of them waking you in the night to get up and access their kitty litter or want to go outside.
  • Ensure you have Protect-A-Bed® Mattress and Pillow protectors on your beds. The Protect-A-Bed® Miracle Layer™ will stop any drool, bacteria, dander and accidental spills from staining your mattresses and contributing to the growth of mould and bacteria.
  • Associate bedtime with sleep time not play time. Avoid having any kitten or puppy toys in the bedroom. 

If you have a puppy, consider how big it is going to get.  Sleeping with it while it is young might be comfortable but what happens when it gets older and bigger. Training a dog, which is going to outgrow the ability for you to comfortably share a bed, to sleep somewhere else, is much easier when they are a puppy and before habits are formed.

And if you suffer from allergies or asthma which can be triggered by pet dander, consider giving your pet lots of affection before bedtime and keeping your sleep areas separate.   

Always avoid letting pets sleep with babies and young children. 

Healthy Sleep, Healthy Ageing

World Sleep Day - 15 March 2019

Friday the 15th of March is World Sleep Day, an annual event arranged by the World Sleep Society, designed to raise awareness of the importance of sleep and draw attention to sleep related issues, and this years focus is on Healthy Sleep, Healthy Ageing.

As we age, our sleep patterns and the amount of sleep we need to help maintain our physical and mental health changes. 

“As we get older, the hormones that help us sleep are released earlier in the day.  Some older adult’s may feel sleepy earlier than they used to and they may wake up in the early hours of the morning.  Melatonin is a hormone that is produced naturally in the body at night which promotes sleep.  Older people make less melantonin so they may find it difficult to get off to sleep. Other factors may interfere with sleep and cause awakenings during the night.  These include hot flushes in postmenopausal women and the need to go to the toilet during the night.” – Sleep Health Facts Ageing and Sleep.  Sleep Health Foundation.

The affects of a lack of sleep on our daily lives and functioning can be significant.  A lack of sleep can result in:

  • Reduced alertness
  • Reduced concentration and attention span
  • A loss of motivation
  • Poor judgement and decision making skills
  • A reduced work efficiency
  • Slower reaction times
  • An increased likelihood of moodiness or a bad temper
  • Poor memory

And those who are regularly not getting enough sleep tend to look and feel older than they are and have an increased risk of contracting diseases that are associated with ageing such as diabetes and heart disease.

So if you are not getting enough sleep every night, for your long term health and well being, beginning today, make a conscious effort to make some changes that may assist you in getting a better night’s sleep.  

  • Keep regular sleep hours and strengthen your body clocks sleep-wake rhythm. Go to bed and get up at the same time everyday.
  • Avoid alcohol, coffee and other caffeinated drinks for at least four hours before bedtime.
  • Put down mobile phones and tablets an hour before bedtime, and leading up to bedtime use them in moderation and in night mode where available.
  • If you think you may have a sleep disorder, which may include snoring, sleep apnea or insomnia, or have a medical condition such as arthritis or depression that is interfering with your sleep see your doctor.

www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/older-people-and-sleeping.html

 

 

The importance of maintaining your children's bed time during school holidays

School holiday’s are here again and along with keeping your little one’s occupied with activities and play dates it can be tempting to let them stay up that little bit later. 

And as tempting as it is, remember that whether you are staying at home or going away it is important that you try to maintain a regular sleep pattern for your children.  Without it they will become tired and grumpy, making your days more difficult and when the holiday’s are over you will have to battle to get them back into their bedtime routine.

As recommended by the Sleep Health Organisation “Bed time should not vary by more than an hour between school and non-school nights” and “the same goes for the time your child wakes up”

To help with this in the holiday’s ensure that you give your children time to relax before bed.  Put away toys and turn of screens.  Anything stimulating.  Try reading a favourite book or listening to some calming music.

If you are travelling and away from home, a different environment can make it difficult for them to settle.  Take with you a toy, pillow or blanket that your child associates with sleep.  It will make them more comfortable and assist in them getting to sleep.

When travelling also ensure that where you are staying has Protect-A-Bed® Mattress and Pillow Protectors.  An unprotected mattress or pillow is home to millions of dust mites, mould and bacteria which may cause allergens, asthma and eczema. 

30% of us are allergic to dust mites so chances are if you or your family are sleeping on an unprotected mattress while away asthma and allergies are more likely to occur.  None of us want to get sick, or have sick children, when away on holidays!

And for those of you who have children still bedwetting, consider taking an extra mattress protector or linen protector of your own with you.  Pop it on the bed and if an accident occurs you can easily remove it in the night, getting back to sleep quickly with the knowledge that the mattress your child is sleeping won’t become wet or stained.

With the holiday’s coming to a close, if you have not been able to maintain the consistent bedtime at the start of the holidays, get back to a normal routine before school starts.   If bedtime has become later than usual, slowly push it back by about 15 minutes or so a night until it is where it should be.

A fun holiday activity that encourages children to keep to their bedtime is making a Sleep Clock.   Head to the Sleep Health Foundations website and download a easy to use template created by Professor Kurt Lushington from the University of South Australia.

Everyone deserves the simple pleasure of a good night’s sleep.