COVID-19 and Delivery Update

We are a proudly Australian owned and operated business and are committed to continuing to support you in this difficult time.

With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.


Deliveries

Delivery networks across Australia are currently experiencing delays.

Detailed information on delays currently being experienced by our Freight Partner, Australia Post, can be found at: https://auspost.com.au/service-updates/domestic-delivery-times

We thank you for your order, and will do our very best to get it to you as soon as possible. For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our client services team at clientservices@sleepcorp.com.au or on 1300 857 123.

Blog

A good night's sleep is important for your immune system

In order to protect our health, and the health of our families, friends, co-workers and neighbours the current coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is making many of us review our current hygiene and sleep habits.

The best way to keep your immune system strong is by living a healthy lifestyle. Having a diet high in fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly and getting adequate sleep, as all of these things contribute to keeping your immune system in check.

Some key things to help protect yourself from illness as suggested by healthcare experts include:

  • Minimise contact with potential germs
  • Exercise to reduce stress
  • Get enough sleep
  • Ensure a healthy sleep environment

Minimise direct contact with potentially germy surfaces.  Follow the government’s advice on how to help protect your well-being and the well-being of others.   Abide by social distancing recommendations and wash your hands regularly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.  More information can be found at healthdirect.gov.au  

Exercise is a proven way of reducing stress, all it takes is as little as 5-10 minutes a day to reduce stress, boost mood, keep the body strong, improve alertness during the day and sleep quality. 

Sleep is incredibly important for your immune system. Research shows that people who do not get enough sleep can have a suppressed immunity, meaning that there is a higher risk of them getting sick.

“Sleep is now well understood to benefit immunity,” says Dr Moira Junge, spokesperson for Australia’s leading sleep advocate Sleep Health Foundation. “An early night may be just what you need to boost your mood and immunity and help protect yourself from illness.” - Sleep Health Foundation, Australia - 

When you sleep, your immune system releases a compound called cytokines. Cytokines are proteins produced by cells, some cytokines interact with cells of the immune system in order to regulate the body’s response to infection.

In times like these where there is concerning news and a lot of uncertainty it can be quite stressful for everyone. Stress can have a big impact on your sleep, it can make falling asleep a real struggle and once you finally get to sleep it can often be troubled with a lot of restlessness. 

If you are having trouble sleeping , ensure you are getting some exercise during the day and try setting aside some time each night to write down or talk about what is concerning you and what you need to do the next day so you don’t lie awake “worrying”.

Importantly make sure, as an adult, you are getting the recommended 8 hours per night sleep.  This is of high significance as it allows your body to rest and repair itself.

Ensure a healthy sleep environment

We spend approximately one third of our lives in bed and although we don’t like to think about it when we are sleeping we are sweating, losing skin flakes, drooling, and coughing.   Things that in an unprotected bed can seep into our mattresses and pillows, providing food for dust mites and resulting in the growth of mould and bacteria.

Protect-A-Bed® Mattress, Pillow and Quilt Protectors, which can easily be removed for regular machine washing and drying, have a Miracle Layer™ that while breathable for a comfortable night's sleep also creates a barrier to stop our sweat, skin flakes and germs entering our pillows, mattresses and quilts. 

Protect-A-Bed®’s Cumulus Mattress and Pillow Protectors are also treated with a naturally derived antimicrobial called Fresche®, that kills 99.99% of bacteria.  Effective for up to 100 washes, it is environmentally friendly and contains no poisons or toxic chemicals.

All Protect-A-Bed® Mattress and Pillow Protectors are recognised by the National Asthma Council of Australia’s Sensitive Choice Program meaning that they provide protection against dust mites a common cause of trigger of asthma, eczema and allergies.   As the new coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads, it’s important for people with asthma to maintain good asthma control and follow the advice from health authorities.  For more information Sensitive Choice

Moving forward in these times of uncertainty and a major health risk to us all it is important that you look after yourself. Minimise your contact with potential germs where possible, exercise daily and sleep well.

Is getting a better night’s sleep one of your New Year’s resolutions?

Protect-A-Bed Blog Make getting a good night's sleep your new years resolution

Sleep is vital to our everyday well being.  Getting the right amount of regular sleep will make you feel more energised and motivated, helping you to achieve other goals that you might have for this year, such as doing more exercise,

Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time.  It will help create a natural rhythm, and sleep-wake cycle for your body. 

Also ensure you are getting the recommended amount of sleep for someone your age.   For an adult this is 7-9 hours a night.  For a guide on the recommended sleep time for different ages check out https://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/how-much-sleep-do-you-really-need.html

Look at what can influence the quality of your sleep, and work on making changes where needed.

  • Have your evening meal at least two hours before bedtime. Having a full stomach can make it difficult to sleep.
  • Avoid caffeine late in the day. Caffeine is a stimulant and although it may give us a much needed wake-up or boost during the day, it can also affect our sleep and contribute to us feeling more tired the following day.  Although there are conflicting views most agree that coffee that should be avoided at least 3-7 hours before bedtime.  Learn more in our Blog “Is how much coffee you drink affecting your sleep” from September 19 which can be found below.
  • Likewise try to avoid alcohol at least four hours before bed. Although alcohol may help you get too sleep, it will disrupt your sleep during the night and is associated with more frequent waking up.

“Another reason people get lower-quality sleep following alcohol is that it blocks REM sleep, which is often considered the most restorative type of sleep. With less REM sleep, you’re likely to wake up feeling groggy and unfocused.”  - sleepfoundation.org 

  • Have a set time before bed that you use to wind down and relax. Don’t overstimulate your body or brain. Avoid strenuous exercise, watching a scary or dramatic TV show, stop checking your work emails or social media….. Try a relaxing bath, mediation, reading or listening to soothing music.
  • Dim your devices screens in the evening and try putting a curfew on your devices of 1-2 hours before bedtime. The longer the better, and avoid checking email or social media in bed.  The blue light emitted from devices such as smartphones, tablets, computers and the TV, can at night all reduce the production of the sleep hormone melatonin.  This may result in difficulty sleeping and increased drowsiness during the day.

Ensure your bedroom offers the best possible sleep environment

  • Keep the bedroom dark at night and ensure the room temperature is not too hot or too cold.

“A cool 16-18°C (60-65°F) is thought to be an ideal temperature in a bedroom. Temperatures over 24°C (71°F) are likely to cause restlessness, while a cold room of about 12°C (53°F) will make it difficult to drop off.”  - Sleep Council UK 

  • Ensure your sleep environment is healthy. Dust mites found in bedding are a common cause of asthma, allergies and asthma.  Protect-A-Bed mattress, pillow and quilt protectors will provide an allergy barrier against any dust mites living in your mattress or quilts.
  • Keep the bedroom for sleep and free of distractions. Where possible no televisions, computers, radio’s and phones.

It may take a little adjustment for you to get into a new routine, but just remember that if you are getting the right amount of sleep regularly you should feel better and have more energy for the things you want to achieve.

Sleep well, live well

 

Don't Let the Bed Bugs Bite

Protect-A-Bed Blog Travelling Bed Bugs

Every year billions of people are travelling and each trip they take the risk of bringing home a bed bug infestation.   

Bed bugs love to hitchhike on luggage. 

Found worldwide and an increasing problem in Australia and New Zealand, be sure to know what to look for these holidays or whenever travelling to ensure you and your family are protected from their nasty bites.

First know what to look for:

Protect-A-Bed Blog Bed BugsSmall in size, they are attracted to warmth, and are most active at night biting areas of exposed skin while sleeping.  Their bite causing an allergic reaction which is displayed on the skin as itchy red welts usually not felt until some minutes or hours after the bite.

Bed bugs have small, flat oval bodies.  Adults are brown in colour, reddening after feeding. Despite common misconceptions that they are too small to see, fully grown they are about 4-5mm in length, small but visible to the naked eye.

Hiding in nooks and crannies they are primarily nocturnal, emerging in the middle of the night to feed on those sleeping.  It is therefore, often not the bed bugs, but tell-tale signs of their infestation that may be seen first. Little brown or black dots found on linens or the mattress itself.

  • Brownish-red splotches from a bed bug that had fed on blood and was shortly thereafter crushed
  • Shredded bed bug skins
  • Deposited white eggs and dark fecal matter. Eggs will be approximately 1mm in length, and difficult, but not impossible to see.
Although found in carpets, the cracks in wooden floors and walls and the seams of furniture they are most common in mattresses.

    What to do when booking a hotel room:

     When booking a hotel room, you can:

    • First check to see if they have had any reviews indicating a past history of struggling with a bed bug infestation.  
    • See if there is a Bed Bug Registry for the country you are travelling to that documents cases of bed bugs in hotels and apartments.
    • You may also wish to call the hotel to see what Bed Bug protective measures they have in place, such as the use of Protect-A-Bed® Buglock® Mattress Encasement's.

     What to do when you get to your hotel:

    1. Before checking for bed bugs keep your luggage in the bathroom; it’s the least likely place for bed bugs due to the tile floors, lack of places to hide, and distance from where people sleep. 
    2. Then, inspect for the bugs or the small spots they leave behind. Look under the sheets and bedding, around and under the mattress, and behind the headboard.
    3. Keep searching; bed bugs are typically found about 4 metres from the bed so you should also check other areas they could be hiding (behind picture frames, under things on the nightstand, etc).
    4. Lastly, check in the cushions and seams of the furniture in the room, and any other area that you missed.

    If you have discovered bed bugs or evidence that would lead you to suspect their presence, alert the hotel staff immediately, do not stay in that room, and strongly consider finding a new hotel all together.

    Bed bugs in transit:

    There have been reported cases of Bed Bugs in transit.  After all they love to hitchhike on luggage and clothing. Having a hard shell suitcase can assist in eliminating the areas in which a bed bug can hide and it can easily be cleaned with an alcohol wipe after your flight.  If you do see any signs of bed bugs while travelling let the flight attendant on your plane or tour guide know as soon as possible.

    When you get home:

    When you get home wash all clothes you took on the trip in hot water including the ones that might be clean or you have worn on the way home.  Vacuum and check your luggage for any signs of bed bugs and then store them safely away from your bed.

    Use Protect-A-Bed® Allerzip Mattress Encasement's on your beds for Fit ‘n’ Forget protection.

    Not only providing peace of mind against bed bugs and dust mite allergens they help protect your mattress investment from everyday spills and stains.

    The Protect-A-Bed® BugLock® system has a dust-proof flap and tamper-proof SecureSeal® making the mattress or pillow bed bug entry and escape proof, whilst also ensuring allergens can’t become airborne. Simply Fit'n'Forget® by laying a Protect-A-Bed®  fitted mattress protector on the top for easy removal and regular washing with other bedding.

    Sleep Well, Live Well

    Is technology affecting your sleep?

    Protect-A-Bed Blog is technology affecting your sleep

    Whether it is watching TV, playing video games, scrolling through social media or checking emails, electronic devices are a big part of our lifestyle and hard to put down when bedtime approaches.

    Although the effects vary between people ‘screen time’ before bed has been shown to impact both our ability to fall asleep and the quality of our sleep. 

    How electronic devices impact our sleep 

    • Electronic devices emit blue light which suppresses the production of the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin, making it harder to fall and stay asleep.
    • By keeping us engaged and stimulated they are hard to walk away from and make it difficult for our brains to relax and wind down at the end of the day.
    • If next to our beds, notifications and late night’s texts from our mobile phones disturb our sleep.

    Tips - How to reduce the impact of 'screen time' on our sleep

    • Dim screens for evening use. Many mobile phones and devices now come with a ‘night mode’ feature that changes your screen to reduce the amount of blue light been emitted. If your device does not have this, there are apps that can be downloaded that may assist.
    • Limit the amount of screen time in the evenings.
    "Studies have tested the effects of bright tablets (e.g. ipads) and laptop screens for up to 5 hours before bed. It seems that the natural evening rise in melatonin (a hormone that makes us ready for sleep) is not affected by 1 hour of bright screen light, but it is after 1.5 hours. Thus after 1.5 hours of technology use in the evening people report feeling less sleepy. They also do better on mental performance tests and their brainwaves suggest increased alertness. Repeated use of a bright screen over 5 days can delay the body clock by 1.5 hours. This means you consistently want to go to bed later and sleep in longer. This can be a real problem when you need to get up at a set time in the morning for school or work."    -  sleephealthfoundation.org.au 
    • Go screen free 30-60 minutes before bedtime.
    • With children, clearly setting and enforcing the rules might be hard at first but once habit will be part of your everyday routine. Include grandparents or caregivers so they know what you are doing at home. Replace screens with traditional books, puzzles and games.
    • If possible, make bedrooms a screen free zone.
    • If your mobile phone is in your room and used as an alarm, ensure it is in do not disturb mode so you are not woken by late night text messages or notifications.

    It may be difficult at first, but once you have made a conscious change it will become habit and part of your everyday routine.

    Sleep Well, Live Well

    Napping

    Protect-A-Bed Blog - Napping

     

    If you are finding yourself feeling tired and sleepy during the day a nap may be beneficial.  Reducing fatigue, increasing alertness, improving your mood, performance and reaction time.

    A nap may also help you prepare for and be able to better cope with a late night out, shift work or a long drive.

    As recognised by the Sleep Health Foundation of Australia 

    "Naps can also be good at times when you feel sleepy and you are worried about how well you can do things if you continue without rest. If you feel drowsy during a long drive in the car, a short nap can be taken in a rest area. This will make you more alert during the next phase of the drive.

    Some studies have found that if you start to feel sleepy while driving, it helps to have a cup of coffee, immediately followed by a nap of about 15 minutes. The caffeine takes about 30 minutes to start working so when you wake up both the nap and the caffeine will start to make you feel more alert."

    How long to nap for

    The secret to waking up refreshed from a nap is setting an alarm and making sure you don’t nap for too long. 

    Ideally a nap should only be 15-30 minutes long.  This will ensure that when you wake you are still in the lightest stage of non-REM sleep.   Any longer, where you enter the deeper stages of sleep you risk waking up with what is known as sleep inertia.  Feeling groggy and perhaps more tired and with less energy than before your nap.

    However “If you’re lucky enough to be able to lie down for 90 minutes, your body should have time to make it through one complete sleep cycle where you go from the lightest stage through the deepest stage of sleep and back again, so you’ll wake feeling refreshed.”- sleep.org

     How you can make your nap better

    • Be sure to set an alarm so you are not napping for more than 30 minutes.
    • Nap in a quiet, dark place at a comfortable temperature without any noise or distractions

    “A cool 16-18°C (60-65°F) is thought to be an ideal temperature in a bedroom. Temperatures over 24°C (71°F) are likely to cause restlessness, while a cold room of about 12°C (53°F) will make it difficult to drop off.”  - Sleep Council UK 

    • If you are napping regularly try and nap at the same time each day.
    • 2-3pm may be the ideal time to nap. We often feel most sleepy in the early afternoon as it matches a low point in our bodies circadian rhythm.
    • If taking a nap in your car, ensure you are in a safe place

    And if napping regularly

    Be mindful to remember that a nap does not replace a good night’s sleep.  A nap too late in the day may make it harder to fall asleep at night. And if you find that you are relying on naps during the day or you are not able to sleep at night due to naps talk to your doctor.

     

     

     

    Combating Jet Lag

    Protect-A-Bed Blog - Tips for Combating Jet Lag

    What causes Jet Lag?

    Jet lag occurs when you fly across one or more time zones.

    Daylight plays an important role in our body’s natural biological clock or circadian rhythm, affecting the release of Melatonin which tells us when we should go to sleep and wake up.  Jet lag occurs because our body's circadian rhythm has not had time to synchronise to the change in time zones.

    The result, our body is telling us to stay awake when it’s late at night, or telling us it’s time to sleep when it is the only the middle of the afternoon.

    Jet lag, affects different people differently, and can happen to anyone regardless of their age or level of fitness.

    As recognised by betterhealth.vic.gov.au it is also often worse if you are travelling in an easterly direction

    Your circadian rhythm (body clock) is less confused if you travel westward. This is because travelling west ‘prolongs’ the body clock’s experience of its normal day-night cycle (the normal tendency of the body clock in most of us is slightly longer than 24 hours). Travelling eastwards, however, runs in direct opposition to the body clock. If you suffer badly from jet lag, it may be worthwhile considering a westerly travel route if possible.

    Symptoms of Jet Lag

    The symptoms of Jet Lag vary between people.  They may include:

    • Insomnia
    • Fatigue
    • Headaches
    • Irritability
    • Loss of Appetite
    • Lack of concentration

    Coping with Jet Lag

    Jet lag generally lasts for 2-3 days and although there is no cure there are things that you can do before, during and after travel to help.

    Before Leaving 

    • Ensure you have had enough sleep leading up to your travel and are not already suffering from a lack of sleep.
    • If possible, begin moving your sleep patterns towards the sleep and wake time at your destination. Go to bed and get up a little earlier or later, gradually adjusting the length of time before your trip.

    During the Flight 

    • Change the time on your watch to the time at your destination as soon as possible. The sooner you make the change, the easier it will be.
    • Open the blinds on your flight to allow in sunlight only during the daylight hours at your destination.
    • Try to sleep on the plane during the night time hours at your destination. A sleep mask, headphones or ear plugs may help block out any light and noise.
    • Attempt to eat and sleep on the plane at the same time you will be eating and sleeping at your destination.
    • Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Avoid alcohol and drinks that contain caffeine that may disturb your sleep cycles.  (see our blog on Coffee and Sleep) 

     After the Flight

    • Adjust your sleeping and eating patterns to the new time zone as soon as possible. Try to stay awake to your usual bedtime and get up when you normally would rather than having a sleep in.
    • The Sleep Health Foundation does recommend that you can take short naps when adapting, which may help you feel more alert if necessary but also state that
    “It is important that you sleep for no longer than 30 minutes and that you are awake for at least 4 hours before you go to bed.” 
    • If possible, during the day get outside or expose yourself to as much natural light as possible. Remember that daylight works with our Circadian Rhythm which tells us when it’s time to be awake and sleep.
    • When ready to go to sleep, make sure the room you are staying in is set at the optimal temperature for sleep which is around 18-20 degrees and use ear plugs or headphones to drown out any unfamiliar sounds that may stop you falling asleep or wake you in the night.

    Most importantly be prepared to give yourself the time to adjust. It will often take at least 2-3 days.

     

    Spring clean your bedroom and help control allergens

    Protect-A-Bed Spring Cleaning Blog

    Spring has sprung, footy season is nearing an end, the tulips are blooming and the weather is getting warmer, but it is also allergy season. For many of us this means a stuffy or runny nose, itchy eyes or skin and lots of sneezing.

    Common causes of allergies include:

    Pollen

    Affecting a lot of people pollen allergies or hayfever are caused by an allergy to the pollen produced by flowers, trees, grasses and weeds.  Pollen gets into the home when you open the doors and windows or travels inside on your clothing or with pets.  It is often further dispersed through the home by cooling and heating systems.

    Dust Mites

    Dust mites are one of the most common causes of allergies in the home.  Millions of these tiny creatures live in our mattresses, bed linen, carpets and furnishings.  Feeding of our skin cells, and producing waste, studies show that are a known cause or trigger of asthma and eczema. 

    Mould

    Mould is often found in damp, poorly ventilated areas such as kitchens, bathrooms and laundries. Mould and bacteria are also often found in mattresses and pillows with our perspiration, shredded skin cells and everyday spills and stains helping provide the perfect conditions for it to grow.

    Pets

    Fairly common, pet allergies are triggered by pet dander from animals such as such as cats and dogs.  Pets also often carry inside other allergens such as pollen and dust.

    While there is not a lot you can do to control your outdoor environment, there are things you can do when spring cleaning, to help control your indoor environment, and in particular the bedroom, where seasonal allergies can be triggered all year round.

    Spring cleaning the Bedroom – Tips

    Get Prepared

    • Make sure you have all your cleaning supplies at hand.
    • Have three boxes on hand - one for rubbish, one for things that don’t belong in the bedroom and one for anything, such as old clothes, that you might like to donate to charity.

    Clear the bedroom of clutter

    • Remember that the bedroom should be a peaceful area, a sanctuary. Remove any items that are not used or are unnecessary. Are they rubbish, do they belong in another room or can they go to charity?
    • Consider removing TVs or Computers. The blue light emitted from screens can reduce the production of the sleep hormone melatonin which may result in difficulty sleeping and increased drowsiness during the day.

    Clean out the wardrobe and dresser drawers

    • Start by taking everything out.
    • If possible, store away any winter clothing and shoes.
    • We all have things in our wardrobe and drawers that we no longer wear.  When deciding what to put back ask yourself the following questions. Have I worn it in the last 12 months? Will I wear it again? Does it still fit? Do I like the way it looks? Is it damaged?
    • The things you don't need, if not damaged, consider selling online or donating to charity.

     Dust

    • Dust all surfaces in the bedroom with a damp or electrostatic cloth.
    • Remove all items from dressers and shelves, returning them as you go.
    • Move from one side of the room to the other so no areas are missed.

     Wipe down the walls

    • Clean off any marks. 
    • If you have young artists in the household and are using a cleaning block or another cleaning chemical always test in an inconspicuous area to ensure it does not fade or damage the paint or wallpaper. 

    Clean windows and window furnishings

    • Clean your windows, inside and out. You might want to try using a water/vinegar mixture with a microfibre cloth. Don’t forget the window frames and tracks. If needed a toothbrush is great for getting into the corners.
    • Take down and wash curtains.
    • Dust and wipe down blinds with warm water.

    Clean Flooring

    • Thoroughly vacuum the carpet or floor boards using a good quality vacuum cleaner with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter.
    • If you can, move furniture to get underneath.
    • Mop floor boards. Consider a professional clean for the carpet.
    • Wipe down baseboards.

    Vacuum soft furnishing

    • Any chairs, couches or soft furnishings should also be vacuumed with a good quality vacuum cleaner with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter.

    Replace Filters  

    • If your heating and cooling system is due for new filters, spring is a great reminder to replace them and preferably with HEPA versions if possible.

    Strip and clean your bedding

    • Remove and clean all bedding, including sheets, blankets, mattress and pillow protectors. Washing in hot water (above 55°C will kill any dust mites).
    • Cover your mattress and pillows with Protect-A-Bed® mattress and pillow protectors. Protect-A-Bed®’s Miracle Layer™ acts as a barrier against any dust mite, mould and bacteria allergens that may be present in your mattress or pillows.  They also protect your mattress from yellowing that is caused by your perspiration and everyday spills. Recognised by the National Asthma Council of Australia and the Asthma and Respiratory Foundation of New Zealand’s Sensitive Choice Program you will see the Sensitive Choice Blue Butterfly on Protect-A-Bed® packaging.

    If you or someone in your family suffer from severe allergies, asthma or eczema consider using Protect-A-Bed®’s Fully Encased Mattress Protectors. 

    The fully encased Protect-A-Bed® Allerzip® Mattress and Pillow Encasement's feature a unique BugLock® system. which has a dust mite proof flap and Secure Seal® providing total protection.  Preventing dust mite, mould and bacteria allergens entering or escaping through the zipper.

    Simply Fit n’ Forget by layering a Protect-A-Bed® Fitted Mattress Protector over the top for regular washing and drying with other linens.

    • And as you are most likely putting the flannel sheets away for the year, why not try some sheets and mattress protectors designed to keep you cool and comfortable? Those made from TENCEL™, for example, are hypoallergenic, smooth on the skin, and help manage heat and moisture for better sleep in warmer weather.
    • Don’t forget to wash or have your pillows dry-cleaned.
    • Fold and put into storage any winter bedding no longer needed.
    • Wipe down the bed frame.
    • Flip and rotate your mattress

    Finally consider keeping flowers (with pollen) and pets out of the bedroom. 

    Sit back, relax and enjoy the warmer days and remember if your allergies are triggered by pollen stay indoors on dry windy days and especially after storms as these are peak periods for airborne allergens.