COVID-19 and Delivery Update

We are a proudly Australian owned and operated business and are committed to continuing to support you in this difficult time.

With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.


Deliveries

Delivery networks across Australia are currently experiencing delays.

Detailed information on delays currently being experienced by our Freight Partner, Australia Post, can be found at: https://auspost.com.au/service-updates/domestic-delivery-times

We thank you for your order, and will do our very best to get it to you as soon as possible. For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our client services team at clientservices@sleepcorp.com.au or on 1300 857 123.

Blog

Healthy Sleep, Healthy Ageing

World Sleep Day - 15 March 2019

Friday the 15th of March is World Sleep Day, an annual event arranged by the World Sleep Society, designed to raise awareness of the importance of sleep and draw attention to sleep related issues, and this years focus is on Healthy Sleep, Healthy Ageing.

As we age, our sleep patterns and the amount of sleep we need to help maintain our physical and mental health changes. 

“As we get older, the hormones that help us sleep are released earlier in the day.  Some older adult’s may feel sleepy earlier than they used to and they may wake up in the early hours of the morning.  Melatonin is a hormone that is produced naturally in the body at night which promotes sleep.  Older people make less melantonin so they may find it difficult to get off to sleep. Other factors may interfere with sleep and cause awakenings during the night.  These include hot flushes in postmenopausal women and the need to go to the toilet during the night.” – Sleep Health Facts Ageing and Sleep.  Sleep Health Foundation.

The affects of a lack of sleep on our daily lives and functioning can be significant.  A lack of sleep can result in:

  • Reduced alertness
  • Reduced concentration and attention span
  • A loss of motivation
  • Poor judgement and decision making skills
  • A reduced work efficiency
  • Slower reaction times
  • An increased likelihood of moodiness or a bad temper
  • Poor memory

And those who are regularly not getting enough sleep tend to look and feel older than they are and have an increased risk of contracting diseases that are associated with ageing such as diabetes and heart disease.

So if you are not getting enough sleep every night, for your long term health and well being, beginning today, make a conscious effort to make some changes that may assist you in getting a better night’s sleep.  

  • Keep regular sleep hours and strengthen your body clocks sleep-wake rhythm. Go to bed and get up at the same time everyday.
  • Avoid alcohol, coffee and other caffeinated drinks for at least four hours before bedtime.
  • Put down mobile phones and tablets an hour before bedtime, and leading up to bedtime use them in moderation and in night mode where available.
  • If you think you may have a sleep disorder, which may include snoring, sleep apnea or insomnia, or have a medical condition such as arthritis or depression that is interfering with your sleep see your doctor.

www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/older-people-and-sleeping.html

 

 

The importance of maintaining your children's bed time during school holidays

School holiday’s are here again and along with keeping your little one’s occupied with activities and play dates it can be tempting to let them stay up that little bit later. 

And as tempting as it is, remember that whether you are staying at home or going away it is important that you try to maintain a regular sleep pattern for your children.  Without it they will become tired and grumpy, making your days more difficult and when the holiday’s are over you will have to battle to get them back into their bedtime routine.

As recommended by the Sleep Health Organisation “Bed time should not vary by more than an hour between school and non-school nights” and “the same goes for the time your child wakes up”

To help with this in the holiday’s ensure that you give your children time to relax before bed.  Put away toys and turn of screens.  Anything stimulating.  Try reading a favourite book or listening to some calming music.

If you are travelling and away from home, a different environment can make it difficult for them to settle.  Take with you a toy, pillow or blanket that your child associates with sleep.  It will make them more comfortable and assist in them getting to sleep.

When travelling also ensure that where you are staying has Protect-A-Bed® Mattress and Pillow Protectors.  An unprotected mattress or pillow is home to millions of dust mites, mould and bacteria which may cause allergens, asthma and eczema. 

30% of us are allergic to dust mites so chances are if you or your family are sleeping on an unprotected mattress while away asthma and allergies are more likely to occur.  None of us want to get sick, or have sick children, when away on holidays!

And for those of you who have children still bedwetting, consider taking an extra mattress protector or linen protector of your own with you.  Pop it on the bed and if an accident occurs you can easily remove it in the night, getting back to sleep quickly with the knowledge that the mattress your child is sleeping won’t become wet or stained.

With the holiday’s coming to a close, if you have not been able to maintain the consistent bedtime at the start of the holidays, get back to a normal routine before school starts.   If bedtime has become later than usual, slowly push it back by about 15 minutes or so a night until it is where it should be.

A fun holiday activity that encourages children to keep to their bedtime is making a Sleep Clock.   Head to the Sleep Health Foundations website and download a easy to use template created by Professor Kurt Lushington from the University of South Australia.

Everyone deserves the simple pleasure of a good night’s sleep.

10 TIPS for a Better Night's Sleep

Sleep is vital to our health and well-being, affecting how we feel, and how productive we are. 

If you are not getting the 7-9 hours of quality sleep a day that most adults need, you may be among other things, lacking in energy, getting frustrated easily, feeling sleepy during the day and having trouble concentrating.

  1. Establish a routine – try and go to bed at the same time each night. We all have an internal body clock, controlled by a part of our brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). This triggers a hormone called melatonin which makes us feel sleepy at night.  This clock is most effective when one has a regular sleep routine and when working effectively you will feel sleepy at your bedtime.
  1. Avoid caffeine for at least four hours before going to bed. Not just coffee and tea, this also includes soft drinks, energy drinks and chocolate.  Caffeine is one of a number of stimulants that can make it harder to get to sleep, make you sleep more lightly and wake up more during the night, often to go to the bathroom.
  1. Avoid Alcohol for at least 4 hours before bedtime. According to the Sleep Health Foundation  “Although alcohol will make you feel sleepy and may help you fall asleep at night, it actually disrupts your sleep later.  In the second half of the night, sleep after drinking alcohol is associated with more frequent awakenings, night sweats, nightmares, headaches and is much less restful”
  1. Avoid cigarettes all together but if not possible at least 2 hours before bed. Like caffeine these are a stimulant making it harder to fall asleep and to stay asleep.
  1. Avoid going to bed on a full or empty stomach. Your evening meal should ideally be a least 2 hours before bedtime.  Although you don’t want to be hungry if your stomach is too full and uncomfortable it can be difficult to sleep.
  1. Dim your devices screens in the evening and try putting a curfew on your devices of 1-2 hours before bedtime. The longer the better, and no checking email or social media in bed.  The blue light emitted from devices such as smartphones, tablets, computers and the TV can, at night, all reduce the production of the sleep hormone melatonin.  This may result in difficulty sleeping and increased drowsiness during the day.
  1. Ensure you have a comfortable and healthy sleep environment.  There should be no distractions, such as televisions and phones, in the bedroom.  You should be warm but not too hot.  The ideal ambient temperature for falling asleep is in the high teens – between 15°C and 20°C.
  1. Use Protect-A-Bed mattress, pillow and quilt protectors. These will create a healthier sleep environment providing a barrier against dust mites.  Approximately 30% of us are allergic to dust mites, which live in our bedding and are a known trigger of asthma, allergies and eczema.  
  1. Set aside the hour before your bedtime to just relax and wind down. Listen to music or perhaps read a book.  If you find you can’t shut down your mind when you go to bed use this time to think about the day gone by and the day ahead.  Write down any plans so that when you go to bed you have already thought through them.  And if your mind continues to be active in bed, try thinking of something relaxing and calming.  A walk along the beach, a favourite memory....
  1. If you are having trouble nodding off to sleep, after 20-30 minutes get up. Just relax or read a book (no devices!) and go back to bed when you feel sleepy. Sleep is not something you can force and you do not want to associate going to bed with not been able to sleep and feeling frustrated.

Just remember that what works for one person may not work for another and it is not always possible to stick to a set routine.  By adopting these habits however your sleep should improve.  With the right amount of quality sleep you will feel better and be more productive.  If you are not finding anything that works you should consult your GP.