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With the health and safety of both employees and customers our priority, we have been working closely with government agencies and industry bodies to ensure our manufacturing and distribution sites remain within best practice hygiene protocols and in accordance with all state and federal requirements. We are exceptionally thankful and grateful for your support at this time.

For further information or if you have any questions, please reach out to our Marketing Manager Karen Bowen.  karen.bowen@sleepcorp.com.au or  0434 043 219

Turn back the clocks this Sunday, and follow these 5 tips to help your body clock adjust

Protect-A-Bed Daylight Savings

It is the first Sunday of April this weekend which means daylight savings is over, and it is time to turn our clocks back an hour at 3am to 2am.

Today, most smartphones and computers will automatically do this for us, but if you have an analog clock you should set yourself a reminder to do this before you go to bed Saturday night.

As the days shorten, by turning our clocks back, it means we are exposed to more bright light in the mornings. 

As quoted in a 7 news article, Sleep and Circadian Researcher at Central Queensland University Amy Reynolds says

“Exposure to bright light in the morning, which happens when we are not on daylight saving time, is more ideal for our systems, as it synchronizes our body clocks to the day, and to the social requirements we have in the world, things like starting work and school in the morning.”

Changing our clocks in either direction changes the principle time cue (which is light) for setting and resetting our 24 hour natural cycle, or circadian rhythm. Therefore, our internal clocks become out of sync.

To help you adapt your circadian rhythm to the new time
remember the following tips:

  1. As an adult, it is advised to get eight hours of sound sleep, fatigue can exacerbate the negative effects of changing the clock so avoid depriving yourself of sleep and go to bed at an appropriate time.
  2.  Avoid alcohol close to going to sleep. Studies show that it reduces rapid eye movement or (REM) sleep, thus impacting on your brains ability to sleep properly.
  3. Limit caffeine intake 6 hours prior to bed, research has shown that caffeine taken 6 hours prior to sleep has significant effects on sleep disturbance. This will impact on your ability to get a restful sleep.
  4. As light suppresses the secretion of the sleep-inducing substance melatonin expose yourself to light during the day, but minimise all light sources when you go to sleep.  Try to avoid the blue light from cell phones and other screens at least two hours before bedtime.
  5. Improve your sleep hygiene. Sleep hygiene refers to creating a sleep friendly environment through things such as calming bedtime routines, exercising several hours before sleeping, listening to music, reading a book or having a hot shower before bed.

Turn back your clocks this Sunday and remember that with a good night sleep you will feel and function better.